Drawing Blood: Technology and Disease Identity in Twentieth-Century America

 
Drawing Blood: Technology and Disease Identity in Twentieth-Century America by Keith A. Wailoo
Published: 
February, 1999
ISBN: 
978-0801861819
Publisher: 
Johns Hopkins University Press

In Drawing Blood, medical historian Keith Wailoo uses the story of blood diseases to explain how physicians in this century wielded medical technology to define disease, carve out medical specialties, and shape political agendas. As Wailoo's account makes clear, the seemingly straightforward process of identifying disease is invariably influenced by personal, professional, and social factors―and as a result produces not only clarity and precision but also bias and outright error.

Drawing Blood reveals the ways in which physicians and patients as well as the diseases themselves are simultaneously shaping and being shaped by technology, medical professionalization, and society at large. This thought-provoking cultural history of disease, medicine, and technology offers an important perspective for current discussions of HIV and AIDS, genetic blood testing, prostate-specific antigen, and other important issues in an age of technological medicine.

Area of Interest: 
Cultural History
Medicine & Health
Period: 
20th Century
Region: 
United States