Princeton Historical Review

The Princeton Historical Review (PHR) is a bi-annual publication of historical scholarship written by Princeton students. Completely student-run and edited, PHR showcases the best undergraduate academic work in history. PHR collaborates with faculty in the Department of History and related departments to identify exemplary papers. Students may also submit papers directly.

For more information about the publication or how to submit papers to PHR, please contact Co-Editors-in-Chief Ryan Chavez '19 (rdchavez@princeton.edu) and Kasia Kalinowska '19 (kak3@princeton.edu). You can also find information about the Princeton Historical Review on Facebook.

Issues:

Spring 2018 Princeton Historical ReviewSpring 2018:

"The Forces Behind Growth in Women's Intercollegiate Athletics: A Grassroots History of Title IX in Its Early Years"
Jackson Springer

"The 1960 Agadir Earthquake: A Case Study of Disappearing Jewish Communities in Morocco"
Katie Tyler

"'Egypt' and Emancipation: An Exploration of Partisanship in Wartime Illinois"
Ian Iverson

 

 

 

The Princeton Historical Review Fall 2017Fall 2017:

"Disrupting the Melting Pot: The Invention of the Black Educated Elite and the Performance of Citizenship in Post-Emancipation New York City, 1799-1863"
Gabriella Taylor

"Princeton's Lost Museum: Arnold Guyot's E.M. Museum and the Great Juncture of American Natural History Museums in the Late 19th Century"
Harrison Blackman

"Education, Narcissism, and Apartheid: The Progression of Student Activism on American Campuses"
Tyler Bozeman

 

 

Princeton Historical Review Fall 2016Fall 2016:

"Memories of Anarcofeminismo: Mujeres Libres and Gender During the Spanish Civil War"
Tahireh Hicks

"Sally Frank Against the Eating Clubs: Influencing the Culture of Antifeminism"
Paige Alexis Shaw

"'Opeu nenamictiliztli:' Marriage as a Case-Study for Conversion in Sixteenth-Century New Spain"
Sergios Leos

"The Chairman's Wife Dances: Madame Mao and the Creation of the Model Chinese Ballets"
Claire Ashmead

 

Princeton Historical Review Spring 2016Spring 2016:

"More Than Mere Ideology: Representations of the Taiping Rebellion in Maoist History Textbooks"
Kar Min Lim

"Americanos, Bolivianos, Chimanes: The Beni Biosphere Reserve and Modern Convervation in Latin America"
Marlis Hinckley

"A 'Small Crack' in the Wall: The Portrayal of Non-Conforming Families in the Political Rhetoric of the Postwar Era"
Avery Stewart

"'A City Chosen at Random': A Social History of Japanese-American Resettlement in Post-War Philadelphia"
Ryan Low