Global History Workshop

Global History WorkshopThe Global History Workshop (GHW) is a lunchtime lecture series that provides a forum for scholars from institutions in the United States and around the world to present their research in the field of global history broadly defined. The Global History Workshop is an integral part of the programming for the Global History Lab, which is housed in the Department of History and is home to a diverse group of faculty and students working in the field of global history. 

For the 2022-23 academic year, the Colonialism and Imperialism Workshop (CIW) will be presented under the Global History Workshop.

GHW is coordinated by Charlie Argon and Pablo Pryluka, under the direction of Professor Jeremy Adelman.

View past events in our archive.

Support for Graduate Students

For graduates, we offer a two-semester sequence of seminars. The first covers the period from 1300-1850 and the second from 1850 to the present. We also coordinate the Global History Workshop, which provides a forum for graduate students and scholars from institutions in the United States and around the world to share their research. Finally, together with our worldwide partners, we co-host a variety of conferences, collaboratives, and dissertation workshops that allow for rich intellectual exchanges among faculty and graduate students working in the field of global history, broadly defined.

Faculty and Research Interests

Faculty in the field of global history study the histories of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas in international perspectives; we also explore the connections across and forces that divide regions from each other.

We have a broad conception of global history. For some of us, it means examining the flows of people, commodities, ideas, and institutions across national and regional boundaries and the ways in which these processes of contact, exchange, and integration affect regional and national dynamics. For others, global history also includes the ways in which regional and national dynamics shape global processes. We are also eclectic about the scale of analysis; some focus on micro-histories of transnational experiences; others are more engaged in research on global systems and regimes.

What unites us is our deep interest in narratives about and explanations of processes that transcend familiar national or local boundaries.


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