Global History Lab

COVID-19 Update

The GHL is responding to the COVID-19 by partnering with universities and NGOs around the world to teach history in these challenging times. At present, we are collaborating with:
 
The Fundación Rafael del Pino in Madrid, Spain
The American University in Iraq, Suleimaniya
Panteion University, Athens, Greece
Sciences Po, Paris, France
The Whitakker Intiative for Peace and Development, Kiryandongo, Uganda
Fulbright University Vietnam
 
More details will be posted soon.


About

Global History Lab logoPrinceton’s Global History Lab (GHL) combines the diverse strengths and interests of the History Department’s faculty with a commitment to an engaged, multiperspectival understanding of global history that foregrounds global encounters as an impetus for learning, thinking, and connecting across borders. Through a series of courses taught in conjunction with partner institutions around the world, a vibrant program of workshops and conferences, and our own research projects, we foster truly global conversations, not only among academics, but also among learners hailing from diverse backgrounds.

Members of a collaborative research project between Princeton and Humboldt Universities

Caption: Members of a collaborative research project between Princeton and Humboldt Universities; Image courtesy of Jeremy Adelman.

Teaching and Learning

The Global History Lab runs the online course “A History of the World” (for Princeton undergraduates, HIS 201) in collaboration with a global network of institutions of higher education. Capitalizing on new technologies and pedagogical practices, the course situates the study of global history in a global classroom, encouraging students to learn from and through interactions with peers near and far. Among those peers are refugee and migrant learners in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, making the course an innovative experiment in humanitarian higher education, and fulfilling Princeton’s commitment to be “in the service of humanity.”

To learn more about "A History of the World" course, visit Princeton Online.

In 2019, the GHL launched the pilot of a second online history course for refugee and host community learners who had successfully completed the GHL: History Dialogues (HD). After intensive training in oral history research and ethics, learners embark on independent research projects that they then share with their global colleagues, creating new knowledge and narratives that connect local stories to global themes.

To learn more about this "History Dialogues" course, please view our course trailer.

In addition to these networked global history courses, we teach a rich array of regional and thematic courses at the undergraduate level. Please consult the Registrar’s Course Offerings for a full list of current courses.

For graduates, we offer a two-semester sequence of seminars. The first covers the period from 1300-1850 and the second from 1850 to the present. We also coordinate the Global History Workshop, which provides a forum for graduate students and scholars from institutions in the United States and around the world to share their research. Finally, together with our worldwide partners, we co-host a variety of conferences, collaboratives, and dissertation workshops that allow for rich intellectual exchanges among faculty and graduate students working in the field of global history, broadly defined.

Refugee learners in Camp Kakuma, Kenya

Refugee learners in Camp Kakuma, Kenya. Image courtesy of Elisa Prosperetti.

Refugee learners in Camp Kakuma, Kenya

Refugee learners in Camp Kakuma, Kenya

Undergraduates from Princeton and the University of Geneva learning global history together.

Undergraduates from Princeton and the University of Geneva learning global history together. Image courtesy of Jeremy Adelman.

Faculty and Research Interests

Faculty in the field of global history study the histories of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas in international perspectives; we also explore the connections across and forces that divide regions from each other.

We have a broad conception of global history. For some of us, it means examining the flows of people, commodities, ideas, and institutions across national and regional boundaries and the ways in which these processes of contact, exchange, and integration affect regional and national dynamics. For others, global history also includes the ways in which regional and national dynamics shape global processes. We are also eclectic about the scale of analysis; some focus on micro-histories of transnational experiences; others are more engaged in research on global systems and regimes.

What unites us is our deep interest in narratives about and explanations of processes that transcend familiar national or local boundaries.