"Civil Rights and Moral Wrongs: The Politics of Gay Pride in Metropolitan Atlanta, 1976-1977"

Event date: 
May 6, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:20pm
Speaker(s): 
Jennifer Jones
University of Michigan
Co-Sponsored by: 
Center for Collaborative History
Audience: 
Public

Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies Works-in-Progress

"Civil Rights and Moral Wrongs: The Politics of Gay Pride in Metropolitan Atlanta, 1976-1977"
Jennifer Jones, University of Michigan


This meeting will be held via Zoom. Registration is required to attend. To register, visit:

https://princeton.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMpdO-oqj4tHteInnesVsuCn7cRhV7ARyDR

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing a unique link to join the meeting. For additional information, please email gss@princeton.edu.


Jennifer Dominique Jones is an Assistant Professor of History and Women's Studies at the Univeristy of Michigan. She completed her doctoral degree in the Department of History at Princeton University in 2014.  Prior to her appointment, she was a member of the inagural cohort of the LSA Collegiate Fellowship. Before her appointment to the University of Michigan, she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender & Race Studies and the Department of American Studies at the University of Alabama.  Her areas of research and teaching expertise are African American History after 1877, with a focus on politics and social life and the History of Gender and Sexuality in the United States in the Twentieth Century with a focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) politics and community life.  She teaches courses on LGBTQ History and Political life and Black Sexual Histories. She has also taught Introduction to African American Studies, Black Feminism, and Southern Black Women’s History. Her book monograph, Queering An American Dilemma: Sexuality, Gender and African American Political Organizing, 1945-1993 (under advance contract with University of North Carolina Press) analyzes how politicized concepts of homosexuality and blackness were linked in contestations over black political empowerment and white supremacy. 

Contact: 
Jaclyn M. Wasneski
Region: 
United States
Period: 
20th Century