Colonialism and Imperialism Workshop - "Borders and the Wet West: Indigenous Treaties, Marine Boundaries, and Annexation Schemes in the Mid-Nineteenth-Century Pacific Northwest"

Colonial & Imperial Workshop
Event date: 
April 5, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm
Speaker(s): 
Sean Fraga
Princeton University
Seminar Series: 
Colonialism and Imperialism Workshop
Audience: 
Public

"Borders and the Wet West: Indigenous Treaties, Marine Boundaries, and Annexation Schemes in the Mid-Nineteenth-Century Pacific Northwest"

Sean Fraga, Princeton University


There is a pre-circulated paper for this workshop. To RSVP and to receive a copy of the paper, please email Caitlin Harvey at cpharvey@princeton.edu. A light lunch will be provided.


Water shaped borders in the nineteenth-century colonial Pacific Northwest. Indigenous nations reserved rights to marine resources in treaties they signed with the U.S. The U.S.–British maritime boundary remained unsettled for more than twenty-five years as each side sought strategic control over shipping lanes and harbor approaches. Meanwhile, maritime trade links between American and British colonial settlements kept alive a movement for annexation of British Columbia to the U.S. These events are usually considered separately, but their common marine geography allows us to better understand how and why borders are drawn, whether over water or over land.

Contact: 
Caitlin Harvey
Area of Interest: 
Colonialism & Post Colonialism
Native American
Region: 
American West
Period: 
19th Century