Early Modern History Workshop | Vera Keller, University of Oregon

"Superability: Adaptability and the Idea of the Renaissance Human"
Date
Thursday, April 4, 2024, 4:30 pm6:00 pm
Audience
Public

Speaker

Details

Event Description

"Superability: Adaptability and the Idea of the Renaissance Human"

Vera Keller, University of Oregon


This workshop will be offered for in-person attendance only. 


Vera Keller is Professor and Department Head of History at the University of Oregon. She is the author of over forty essays and of three monographs, Knowledge and the Public Interest, 1575–1725 (Cambridge UP, 2015), The Interlopers: Early Stuart Projects and the Undisciplining of Knowledge (Hopkins, 2023), and Curating the Enlightenment: Johann Daniel Major and the Experimental Century (Cambridge UP, forthcoming in July 2024). Her first book explored the co-production of scientific and political forms of rationality through the intersections of the reason of state with experimental reasoning. Her second book, winner of the 2023 Gordan Prize from the Renaissance Society of America, analyzed the entanglements of knowledge with capitalism, colonialism, and political economy. Her forthcoming book argues for the emergence of the research university in the latter half of the seventeenth century. It describes how academics forged dynamic and revocable superstructures for knowledge, the research disciplines, in order to safeguard the liberal arts from an immediate application to use. Her next research project, Superability, aims to offer a disability history of Renaissance ability.


Vera Keller will also be presenting at this upcoming conference hosted by the Department of Art & Archaeology...

 Friday, April 5 | 9:15 am – 5:30 pm
Louis A. Simpson International Building A71
"Metamorphic Matter: Elemental Imagery in Early Modern Art"

For more information and to register visit:

https://artandarchaeology.princeton.edu/whats/events/metamorphic-matter-elemental-imagery-early-modern-art

 

Contact
Constantine Theodoridis
Area of Interest
Art History
Scholarly Series
Early Modern History Workshop