Economic History Workshop - “General Laws and the Transformation of Government in the Mid-Nineteenth-Century United States”

Economic History Workshop
Event date: 
November 6, 2019 -
4:30pm to 6:00pm
Speaker(s): 
Naomi Lamoreaux
Yale University
Seminar Series: 
Economic History Workshop
Co-Sponsored by: 
The Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy & Finance
Audience: 
Public

“General Laws and the Transformation of Government in the Mid-Nineteenth-Century United States”

Naomi Lamoreaux

Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History, Yale University


Naomi R. Lamoreaux is Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She received her Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins in 1979 and has taught at Brown and the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written The Great Merger Movement in American Business, 1895-1904 and Insider Lending:  Banks, Personal Connections, and Economic Development in Industrial New England, edited eight other books, and published numerous articles on business, economic, and financial history.  She also co-edited the Journal of Economic History from 1992 to 1996.  Lamoreaux has been elected president of the Business History Conference and the Economic History Association and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Cliometrics Society.  She has been awarded the Alice Hanson Jones book prize, the Henrietta Larson, PEAES, and Arthur Cole article prizes, the Harold Williamson Prize for an outstanding business historian in mid-career, the Cliometrics award for exceptional support to that field, and the Business History Conference’s Lifetime Achievement Award.  Her current research interests include patenting and the market for technology in the late nineteenth and twentieth century U.S., business organizational forms and contractual freedom in the U.S. and Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the public/private distinction in U.S. history, and the rise and decline of innovative regions.

Contact: 
Robert Yee
Area of Interest: 
Economic History
Region: 
United States