Modern Europe Workshop - "Transparency, Complexity, and Modernity: French Perspectives on the Legacy of the Enlightenment after WWII"

Modern America Workshop
Event date: 
March 5, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm
Speaker(s): 
Stefanos Geroulanos
New York University
Commentators: 
Edward Baring
Drew University
Seminar Series: 
Modern Europe Workshop
Audience: 
Public

"Transparency, Complexity, and Modernity: French Perspectives on the Legacy of the Enlightenment after WWII"

Stefanos Geroulanos, New York University


To receive a copy of the pre-circulated paper and to attend, RSVP to Jonathan Catlin at jcatlin@princeton.edu. A light lunch will be provided.


Stefanos Geroulanos is Associate Professor of European History at New York University, where he has served as director of the CNRS Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences and associate director of the Remarque Institute. He is the author of Transparency in Postwar France: A Critical History of the Present (2017), An Atheism That Is Not Humanist Emerges in French Thought (2010) and Experimente im Individuum. Kurt Goldstein und die Frage des Organismus (with Todd Meyers, 2014). His book The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Science, and the Great War, coauthored with Todd Meyers, is forthcoming in June. He has translated and co-edited several volumes including, with Zvi Ben-Dor Benite and Nicole Jerr, The Scaffolding of Sovereignty: Global and Aesthetic Perspectives in the History of a Concept (2017); and, with Natasha Wheatley and Dan Edelstein, Power and Time (forthcoming). He co-edits the book series Forms of Living at Fordham University Press and is one of the executive editors of the Journal of the History of Ideas.


Edward Baring is Associate Professor of Modern European History at Drew University. He is the author of The Young Derrida (Cambridge, 2011), which won the Morris D. Forkosch Prize for Intellectual History, and is finishing a new book, Converts to the Real: Catholicism and the Making of European Phenomenology, which will appear with Harvard University Press next spring. He was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2015.

 

Contact: 
Jonathan Catlin
Region: 
Europe
Period: 
20th Century