POSTPONED - African History Workshop: "Kokoo kum akyere: A Surface Reading of Skin Color Aesthetics in Twentieth-Century Ghanaian Newspapers"

African History Workshop
Event date: 
April 24, 2020 -
1:30pm to 3:00pm
Speaker(s): 
Carina Ray
Brandeis University
Seminar Series: 
African History Workshop
Audience: 
Public

THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL FALL 2020

 

"Kokoo kum akyere: A Surface Reading of Skin Color Aesthetics in Twentieth-Century Ghanaian Newspapers"

Carina Ray, Brandeis University


For more information and to attend this wokrshop, email Ray Thornton at rayt@princeton.edu.


Carina E. Ray is a historian of Africa and the Black Atlantic world with primary research and teaching interests in race and sexuality; comparative colonialisms and nationalisms; migration and maritime history; and the relationship between race, ethnicity, and political power. Her current book projects form a trilogy that takes up questions of race-making and blackness across the precolonial, colonial, and post-independence periods in Ghana. Somatic Blackness: A History of the Body in Precolonial Ghana traces the development of indigenous ideas about blackness, the body, and human difference within local, regional, and global networks of exchange and knowledge production. Black on White: Writing Race in the Gold Coast Press (1857-1957) and Becoming Black Stars: Race and State Politics in Twentieth-Century Ghana track the transformations that occurred during the colonial and post-independence periods as Ghanaians constructed and claimed blackness as a political identity in opposition to (white) British colonial rule and in conversation with African nationalism and global Pan-Africanism. Ray is also working on an oral history project which documents the sprawling Cuban presence in Cold War era Africa in its full ideological complexity from the perspective of the Cuban men and women who served there.

Contact: 
Ray Raymond Thornton
Field: 
Region: 
Sub-Saharan Africa