Archive

2018-2019

Natasha Wheatley's article "Spectral Legal Personality in Interwar International Law: On New Ways of Not Being a State" won the 2018 Surrency Prize from the American Society for Legal History.

The story of the “attempt at a system of elements,” as Mendeleev titled his initial publication, has been laid out clearly by science historian Michael Gordin in a special issue of the journal Science.

The Hastings Center is a nonpartisan, nonprofit research institution that addresses fundamental ethical questions in medicine, science, and technology.

Margarita Fajardo *15, who received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2015, has been awarded a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Theodore Rabb, professor of history, emeritus, founder of Princeton’s “Humanities Sequence” and an innovative teacher of generations of students, died Jan. 7 at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center. He was 81.

History of Science Annual Workshop
February 8-9, 2019
210 & 211 Dickinson Hall

Published this week by W.W. Norton & Company, Fault Lines pinpoints the country’s entrenched political polarization to the mid-1970s, a time when Kruse and Zelizer argue multiple rifts began to occur in the social order.

Princeton researchers Rachel Selinsky and Professor Thomas Conlan are using modern materials analyses to learn about medieval metallurgical practices in Japan.

We stand with Xiyue on this birthday, as we have throughout his unjust detention, and we fervently hope that he will be released with no further delay, so that he may return home as soon as possible to be reunited with his wife and young son.

On Twitter, he specializes in serialized posts, called threads, that lend historical context to breaking news or skewer a version of history spouted by right-wing agitators.

Pages