New Books: January & February 2020

Posted
February 12, 2020

New Books Published by Our Faculty

The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue by Marina RustowThe Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue
Marina Rustow

The lost archive of the Fatimid caliphate (909–1171) survived in an unexpected place: the storage room, or geniza, of a synagogue in Cairo, recycled as scrap paper and deposited there by medieval Jews. Marina Rustow tells the story of this extraordinary find, inviting us to reconsider the longstanding but mistaken consensus that before 1500 the dynasties of the Islamic Middle East produced few documents, and preserved even fewer. Read more.

 

A Slave Between Empires: A Transimperial History of North Africa by M'hamed OualdiA Slave Between Empires: A Transimperial History of North Africa
M'hamed Oualdi

In June 1887, a man known as General Husayn, a manumitted slave turned dignitary in the Ottoman province of Tunis, passed away in Florence after a life crossing empires. As a youth, Husayn was brought from Circassia to Turkey, where he was sold as a slave. In Tunis, he ascended to the rank of general before French conquest forced his exile to the northern shores of the Mediterranean. His death was followed by wrangling over his estate that spanned a surprising array of actors: Ottoman Sultan Abdülhamid II and his viziers; the Tunisian, French, and Italian governments; and representatives of Muslim and Jewish diasporic communities. Read more.

 

Einstein in Bohemia by Michael GordinEinstein in Bohemia
Michael D. Gordin

In the spring of 1911, Albert Einstein moved with his wife and two sons to Prague, the capital of Bohemia, where he accepted a post as a professor of theoretical physics. Though he intended to make Prague his home, he lived there for just sixteen months, an interlude that his biographies typically dismiss as a brief and inconsequential episode. Einstein in Bohemia is a spellbinding portrait of the city that touched Einstein’s life in unexpected ways—and of the gifted young scientist who left his mark on the science, literature, and politics of Prague. Read more.