New Books: June & July 2020

Posted
June 09, 2020

Visit our Faculty Bookshelf and check out the latest publications by our faculty.

 

 Inky Fingers The Making of Books in Early Modern Europe  Anthony GraftonInky Fingers: The Making of Books in Early Modern Europe
By Anthony Grafton (June 9)

From Francis Bacon to Barack Obama, thinkers and political leaders have denounced humanists as obsessively bookish and allergic to labor. In this celebration of bookmaking in all its messy and intricate detail, renowned historian Anthony Grafton invites us to see the scholars of early modern Europe as diligent workers. Meticulously illuminating the physical and mental labors that fostered the golden age of the book—the compiling of notebooks, copying and correction of texts and proofs, preparation of copy—he shows us how the exertions of scholars shaped influential books, treatises, and forgeries. Read more.

 

Voter Suppression in U.S. Elections by Stacey Abrams, Carol Anderson, Kevin M. Kruse, Heather Cox Richardson and Heather Ann ThompsonVoter Suppression in U.S. Elections
by Stacey Abrams, Carol Anderson, Kevin M. Kruse, Heather Cox Richardson, and Heather Ann Thompson; edited by Jim Downs (June 15)

Historians have long been engaged in telling the story of the struggle for the vote. In the wake of recent contested elections, the suppression of the vote has returned to the headlines, as awareness of the deep structural barriers to the ballot, particularly for poor, black, and Latino voters, has called attention to the historical roots of issues related to voting access. Read more.


Burning Down the House Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party by Julian ZelizerBurning Down the House: Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party
By Julian E. Zelizer (July 7)

When Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, President Obama observed that Trump “is not an outlier; he is a culmination, a logical conclusion of the rhetoric and tactics of the Republican Party.” In Burning Down the House, historian Julian Zelizer pinpoints the moment when our country was set on a path toward an era of bitterly partisan and ruthless politics, an era that was ignited by Newt Gingrich and his allies. Read more.

 

Historiography and Identity II: Post-Roman Multiplicity and New Political Identities Edited by G. Heydemann, H. ReimitzHistoriography and Identity II: Post-Roman Multiplicity and New Political Identities
Edited by Gerda Heydemann and Helmut Reimitz (July 20)

This second volume of the series studies the social function of historiography in the Justinianic age and the post-Roman kingdoms of the West. The papers explore how writers in Constantinople and in the various kingdoms from Italy to Britain adopted late antique historiographical traditions and adapted them in response to the new needs and challenges created by the transformation of the political and social order. What was the significance of their choices between different models (or their creation of new ones) for their 'vision of community'? The volume provides a representative analysis of the historiographical resources of ethnic, political, and religious identifications created in the various Western kingdoms. In doing so, it seeks to understand the extant works as part of a once much wider and more polyphonic historiographical debate. Read more.

 

Men on Horseback: The Power of Charisma in the Age of Revolution by David A. BellMen on Horseback: The Power of Charisma in the Age of Revolution
By David A. Bell (July 28)

An immersive examination of why the age of democratic revolutions was also a time of hero worship and strongmen

In Men on Horseback, the Princeton University historian David A. Bell offers a dramatic new interpretation of modern politics, arguing that the history of democracy is inextricable from the history of charisma, its shadow self. Read more.